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BuzzFeed’s “I’m Christian, but I’m Not” Isn’t As Radical As You Think It Is

Yesterday, BuzzFeed posted a video called “I’m Christian, but I’m Not” which has already racked up nearly 8 million views on Facebook alone.It’s full of individuals saying things like “I’m Christian, but I’m not homophobic” and “I’m Christian, but I’m not closed-minded.”

Yesterday, BuzzFeed posted a video called “I’m Christian, but I’m Not” which has already racked up nearly 8 million views on Facebook alone.

It’s full of individuals saying things like “I’m Christian, but I’m not homophobic” and “I’m Christian, but I’m not closed-minded.”

Based on the comments and shares, the video has clearly resonated with Christians who hate being pigeon-holed with these stereotypes.

At the same time, there are plenty of commenters screaming out: You’re not the reason those stereotypes exist!

There’s plenty of truth to that. If more Christians were like the people in this video, we’d be having a very different conversation about faith in this country. But they’re not. Only 24% of white evangelical Christians support marriage equality while more than 60% of evangelicals think abortion should be illegal in all or most cases. So these stereotypes are not without foundation.

It’s obviously unfair to lump together all Christians as anti-gay, anti-women, anti-science bigots… but we’re not talking out of our ass when we say a whole bunch of them really do fit in that category. Forget the people on the fringes; Rick Warren, Joel Osteen, and Franklin Graham are no better on these issues.

That raises another major problem with this video. While I appreciate the sentiments, the people speaking in it don’t actually distance themselves from the Christians who usually come to mind when we hear the C-word.

They say they’re not homophobic, but do they all support marriage equality? Do they think homosexual acts (even between married couples) are sinful? We never get direct answers to that. Remember: Mike Huckabee will tell you he’s not homophobic. Hell, Kim Davis will probably tell you she’s not homophobic.

The Christians in the video may be feminists, but do they also support a woman’s right to have an abortion in most or all cases? They didn’t tell us. Remember: Pastor Mark Driscoll will tell you he loves women.

They say they love science, but do they reject Creationism and God-guided evolution? Who knows. Remember: Ken Ham will tell you he loves science.

If I replaced the people in that video with Christian pastors and leaders, the script would require very few changes. Isn’t that the very problem this video was supposed to fix?

So this video was a missed opportunity. Instead of separating themselves from the stereotypes, they confirmed why they’re really no different from those traditional Christians. They may not like the reputation they have, but until more of them speak out against the so-called leaders of the faith and tell the world why they’re wrong, it’s a reputation that’s not going anywhere.

I would love to see a video of young Christians explaining why they don’t fit the stereotype. This wasn’t it.

It’s just a bunch of Christians — who carefully avoid mentioning Jesus and the Bible — trying to sound cool without saying anything that might get them in trouble.

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